Skip to Content

Sexton vs Jameson: Head to Head!

Discover the differences between Sexton vs Jameson in this in-depth comparison and decide which Irish Whiskey is better for You!

Sexton Single Malt

sexton-single-malt
NoseOrange, lime, honey
PalateCaramel, grassy, lime, orange
FinishMalt, orange, lime
Alcohol content80 proof (40% ABV)
How to drinkAdd water or ice
Similar toBushmills

Sexton is kinda unique among Irish Whiskeys as it’s 100% Irish malted barley as opposed to most that are made from grains and malts and is triple-distilled using copper pots.

The nose is quite floral with little resemblance to a proper whiskey as it offers a high note of orange and lime, along honey.

On the palate, Sexton feels thin lacking in texture. Flavor hits with caramel at first but it also feels warmer than you would expect from something bottled at a mere 80 proof (40% ABV).

Caramel is followed by a charred grassy note, followed by orange and lime bitterness.

The finish has a decent length, is a bit warm, leaving a malty aftertaste along orange and lime.

Adding water releases a bit of caramel, while tuning down the heat making it a tad easier to drink.

Sexton Single Malt is weird, as it has aromas and flavors not typical of Irish Whiskey. It’s also warmer than a typical triple-distilled whiskey which in theory should make this pour smoother.

Not a bad whiskey but definitely not a “plain vanilla” pour as it offers “unique” notes and more warmth than the average Irish Whiskey.

There are a few facts worth knowing about the Sexton Single Malt:

  • Aged for a minimum of 4 years in ex-oloroso sherry butts.
  • Comes in a solid black hexagonal bottle that stands-out in the cabinet.
  • Sexton is made at the Bushmills Distillery in Belfast.
  • Sexton along Bushmills are owned by Mexico’s Jose Cuervo.

Jameson Whiskey

jameson-irish-whiskey
NoseFloral, marmalade, caramel
PalateRipe fruit, vanilla
FinishMedium, caramel, spice
Alcohol content80 proof (40% ABV)
How to drinkCocktails
Similar toBushmills, Red Label

Jameson is the best-selling Irish whiskey across the globe for two solid reasons: It is smooth and affordable offering good value for the money; solid option for casual drinking or something not too pricey and still decent.

Nose is floral with sweet notes of orange marmalade and caramel with a bit of alcohol coming behind but nothing too severe.

On the palate the Jameson shows a good body, is sweet and fruity, with a high vanilla note. There is a pesky metallic note coming late to the party, not something terrible but weird.

The finish has a medium length, mostly sweet with a dash of black pepper on the tail.

It is a smooth and versatile whiskey that mixes nicely in any cocktail with no bad bite, well rounded and gets better when adding a splash of water, ginger ale or ice.

In fact, this might well be the best whiskey for mixed drinks as it mixes practically with everything including Coke.

A few drops of water are enough to tune down alcoholic, peppery notes and that persistent metallic note.

There are a few facts worth knowing about Jameson Whiskey:

  • Jameson is a blend of malted and unmalted barley aged for at least 4 years in ex-bourbon casks from Kentucky and ex-sherry casks from Spain.
  • This whiskey is triple-distilled which is the norm in the Irish whiskey industry. Most spirits in are double-distilled but the Irish add a distillation as they like smooth liquors.
  • Crafted at the Jameson Distillery in Old Midleton.
  • Jameson Irish Whiskey dates back to 1780 when it was founded by a Scottish immigrant.
  • The distillery and the brand are owned by Paris-based Pernod Ricard.

Sexton vs Jameson: Price comparison

Prices are approximate and stated in USD:

WhiskeyPrice
Sexton Single Malt$27
Jameson$20

Sexton vs Jameson: Which is better?

Jameson is easier to like

WhiskeySextonJameson
Nose
Body
Palate
Finish
Value
  • Jameson is a safer bet as it has a traditional whiskey flavor and makes a great pour to mix in any cocktail of your liking or even Irish Coffee.
  • Sexton feels warmer and has some unique aromas and flavors making it more challenging and more of an acquired taste.